cool arame salad with sweet potatoes & tahini.

By the end of this post, you will know how to make arame. Yes, that crazy-looking seaweed mess.

And you will be pretty darn proud of yourself!

Arame Salad with Sweet Potato

Seaweeds are an incredible source of nutrients. They're also a little bit obscure, and I find that when I suggest them to the lovely folks I work with, the suggestion is often greeted with a look of, "What, really?" or "I can cook with that?"

No worries. I hear you. I was too terrified to make any seaweed the first time I bought it, that it sat in the pantry for 3 months before I worked up the nerve to try it out. It can be a little intimidating to stare down a bag of what looks like beach garbage and imagine what you could possibly do to it to make it edible. (Wouldn't it just be easier to go for sushi and order a seaweed salad?) 

Fortunately, bringing seaweed back from the dehydrated dead is actually far easier than it looks... for the most part, it involves soaking until the seaweed plumps back up. Really. That simple. :) 

If you've never cooked with a sea veggie before, allow me to introduce to one of my favorites (and one of the easiest to make): arame.

Say it with me now: Air-a-may! (Nice!)

It's a brown algae commonly used in Japanese cooking, high in a whole array of vitamins and minerals. In fact, sea veggies contain virtually all of the minerals present in ocean water, and have a mineral composition similar to human blood. This makes them excellent tonifiers and balancers for the body, and their uber-high level of iodine (500% of our daily intake needs!) makes them a great choice for supporting hypothyroidism. 

Plus, making a batch couldn't be any simpler:

  • Place arame in cool water. 
  • Let it sit for 10 minutes to plump up.
  • Rinse. 

Aaaaand, you're done! 

It keeps brilliantly in the fridge (perfect for next-day lunches or leftovers), but thanks to its quick preparation, to prevent waste, you can keep arame in its dry form until you're ready to use it. 

The recipe below is a fun way to incorporate this highly detoxifying, nourishing food into a whole meal. I combined it with sweet potatoes for a good punch of energy, leeks for flavor (and because it's always a great idea to add an allium veggie (like garlic, onions, leeks, etc) to a meal for their extra nutrient boost + anti-cancer properties), and tahini for some healthy fat to increase the absorption of the vitamins in the veggies.

You can save a ton of time with this recipe by using a pre-baked sweet potato. I like to make a batch at the beginning of the week and keep them in the fridge. Otherwise, used small cubes of uncooked sweet potato and toss them into your skillet after your leeks and mushrooms have cooked for 1-2 minutes.

No more seaweed fear here -- how about for you? 

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cool arame salad with sweet potatoes + tahini
Serves 1
An unusual blend of arame, sweet potatoes and sauteed leeks and mushrooms.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup cooked arame
  2. 1/2 cup leeks, chopped
  3. 1/4 of a baked sweet potato, sliced
  4. 6 button mushrooms, sliced
  5. 1 tsp olive or sesame oil
  6. 1 tsp tahini
  7. sesame seeds for garnish
Instructions
  1. 1. Soak arame for 10 minutes.
  2. 2. Heat oil over medium. Add leeks and mushrooms; sauté until softened.
  3. 3. Add carrots and sauté 4-5 minutes. Add arame, and cook 1 minute more.
  4. 4. Remove from heat.
  5. 5. Spread your sliced sweet potato onto a plate. Top each with a tiny dollop of tahini, then top with sauteed veg/arame mixture. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve.
Notes
  1. You can save a ton of time with this recipe by using a pre-baked sweet potato. I like to make a batch at the beginning of the week and keep them in the fridge. Otherwise, used small cubes of uncooked sweet potato and toss them into your skillet after your leeks and mushrooms have cooked for 1-2 minutes.
From The Ground Up Wellness http://fromthegroundupwellness.com/
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Posted in dinner, gluten-free recipes, health coaching info, homepage featured, kid-friendly recipes, lunch, recipes

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